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Fear Holding You Back? Decide to Succeed

fear

Fear holding you back? Where do you feel incapable? What daunting task can you complete, one step at a time?

Read on for action steps that will propel you forward.

  • Make the decision to succeed. Once you decide on success you rarely allow doubt to enter your mind. Your persistence, dedication, and resilience are strengthened. You free yourself to do the uncommon and the impossible.
  • Take risks. Chase your fear. Do what scares you. Make the dreaded phone call. Ask for what you want. When you experience rejection, ask someone else. Be bold and brave. Defy the odds.
  • Be prepared. Anticipate your own needs. Unemployment is the world’s fastest-rising worry, according to a BBC World Service survey. Don’t live in fear, create solutions in advance. Know how you will get out, over, around, and through what could go wrong.
  • Let go of urgency and fear. Learn to relax and go with the flow. Our anxiety and stress are caused by living in the pain of the past or the fear of the future. Life happens in the present moment.
  • Focus on the benefits of your success. Become focused on what you will gain. Is your benefit financial freedom, travel, saving the lives of others, or leaving a legacy you can be proud of? When the going gets tough, focus on your “why.”
  • Calm your body. Find a quiet place and bring your attention inward, notice where your fear resides in your body. Notice if you have a tense forehead, shallow breathing, or aching shoulders. Relax the area of your body that’s being affected. Learn to calm and center yourself.
  • Create your own fan base. I believe that most people have good hearts. They want to see you succeed. Believe people are cheering for you. When you are scared out of your mind, imagine everyone you know in one place rooting wildly for you.
  • Participate in life. Turn off your television, electronics, and the negative media. Take a guitar lesson, a skydiving lesson or yoga lesson. Swim in the ocean, hike in the mountains, get back to that yoga class, or go for a morning walk or run.
  • You are enough. Accept who you are and where you are today. When you compare yourself to others you create your own suffering. My friends were in college when I was changing diapers. I was too busy to care. What others think of you is none of your business.

Hugh Macleod, from Gaping Void, has advice for our economic times: “Learn how to work hard, work long hours, find something you love, and then excel at it. Above all else, learn how to create, learn how to invent. That’s your only hope, really.”

I agree with Hugh, however — unless you can learn how to move through your fear, you’ll continue to hold yourself back. You’ll never learn to risk, to excel, to create, to invent or to experience Joy.

Tess Marshall is the founder of The Bold Life, where she inspires people to live a fearless life. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Life is a Gift! Let’s unwrap the package and enjoy the contents!

Life is a Gift! Let’s unwrap the package and enjoy the contents! 
 Life is a gift, and it offers us the privilege, opportunity, and responsibility, to give something back.
Anthony Robbins

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“According to the ‘Fair Use’ clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”
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Gaining Direction by knowing Your Life Purpose


 
Gaining Direction by knowing Your Life Purpose.. During your life you have probably come to some decisions as to the purpose of your life owing to the career, hobbies, interests you pursue. Yet, how about having this pinpointed down for you? Knowing your purpose gives your life more direction, meaning, foundation. I looked into this when researching the Kabalarian Philosophy. (kabal means ‘receive wisdom’) 
 
The Philosophy is based on Numerology and has been used in some format since Ancient History, being developed by Alfred Parker until his death in 1964. It is a life analysis, enabling you to live a more fulfilled and happy life through balancing your name with your birth date.
 
Through Numerology you can get an explanation of the meaning of your name, and whether this is a ‘balanced’ name for you. 
 
To get a multi-page analysis of your full name, nicknames, business signature and birth date, which determines your birthpath or natural purpose in life, go to:
 
 

You will also receive career and compatibility suggestions. It’s invaluable!

 

Here’s an explanation of my purpose:

 

“Your role is to teach others the principles that will lead to a better understanding of human mind and potential, health, happiness, and the attainment of success on all levels.”

 

Let me know if you decide to investigate this free report. I’d love to hear about the meaning of your name, and your purpose. Also, comment on how making any recommended changes has affected your life.  These may range from personal or business success to relationships.

 http://www.kabalarians.com/

 

 

 

 

 

“According to the ‘Fair Use’ clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

 

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Living by Your Values – Mind Tools video

An important aspect of establishing a firm foundation on which to develop your True Self is to have a set of values that guide the way in which you live your life.

 

values

How would you define your values?

Before you answer this question, you need to know what, in general, values are.

Your values are the things that you believe are important in the way you live and work.

They (ideally) determine your priorities, and, deep down, they’re probably the measures you use to tell if your life is turning out the way you want it to.

When the things that you do and the way you behave match your values, life is usually good – you’re satisfied and content. But when these don’t align with your personal values, that’s when things feel… wrong. This can be a real source of unhappiness.

This is why making a conscious effort to identify your values is so important.

 

How Values Help You

Values exist, whether you recognize them or not. Life can be much easier when you acknowledge your values – and when you make plans and decisions that honor them.

If you value family, but you have to work 70-hour weeks in your job, will you feel internal stress and conflict? And if you don’t value competition, and you work in a highly competitive sales environment, are you likely to be satisfied with your job?

In these types of situations, understanding your values can really help. When you know your own values, you can use them to make decisions about how to live your life, and you can answer questions like these:

  • What job should I pursue?
  • Should I accept this promotion?
  • Should I start my own business?
  • Should I compromise, or be firm with my position?
  • Should I follow tradition, or travel down a new path?

So, take the time to understand the real priorities in your life, and you’ll be able to determine the best direction for you and your life goals.

Tip:

Values are usually fairly stable, yet they don’t have strict limits or boundaries.
Also, as you move through life, your values may change. For example, when you start your career, success – measured by money and status – might be a top priority. But after you have a family, work-life balance may be what you value more.

As your definition of success changes, so do your personal values. This is why keeping in touch with your values is a lifelong exercise. You should continuously revisit this, especially if you start to feel unbalanced… and you can’t quite figure out why.

As you go through the exercise below, bear in mind that values that were important in the past may not be relevant now.

Defining Your Values

When you define your personal values, you discover what’s truly important to you. A good way of starting to do this is to look back on your life – to identify when you felt really good, and really confident that you were making good choices.

Step 1: Identify the times when you were happiest

Find examples from both your career and personal life. This will ensure some balance in your answers. 

  • What were you doing?
  • Were you with other people? Who? 
  • What other factors contributed to your happiness?

Step 2: Identify the times when you were most proud

Use examples from your career and personal life. 

  • Why were you proud?
  • Did other people share your pride? Who? 
  • What other factors contributed to your feelings of pride?

Step 3: Identify the times when you were most fulfilled and satisfied

Again, use both work and personal examples. 

  • What need or desire was fulfilled? 
  • How and why did the experience give your life meaning? 
  • What other factors contributed to your feelings of fulfillment?

Step 4: Determine your top values, based on your experiences of happiness, pride, and fulfillment

Why is each experience truly important and memorable? Use the following list of common personal values to help you get started – and aim for about 10 top values. (As you work through, you may find that some of these naturally combine. For instance, if you value philanthropy, community, and generosity, you might say that service to others is one of your top values.)

Accountability
Accuracy
Achievement
Adventurousness
Altruism
Ambition
Assertiveness
Balance
Being the best
Belonging
Boldness
Calmness
Carefulness
Challenge
Cheerfulness
Clear-mindedness
Commitment
Community
Compassion
Competitiveness
Consistency
Contentment
Continuous Improvement
Contribution
Control
Cooperation
Correctness
Courtesy
Creativity
Curiosity
Decisiveness
Democraticness
Dependability
Determination
Devoutness
Diligence
Discipline
Discretion
Diversity
Dynamism
Economy
Effectiveness
Efficiency
Elegance
Empathy
Enjoyment
Enthusiasm
Equality
Excellence
Excitement
Expertise
Exploration
Expressiveness
Fairness
Faith
Family-orientedness
Fidelity
Fitness
Fluency
Focus
Freedom
Fun
Generosity
Goodness
Grace
Growth
Happiness
Hard Work
Health
Helping Society
Holiness
Honesty
Honor
Humility
Independence
Ingenuity
Inner Harmony
Inquisitiveness
Insightfulness
Intelligence
Intellectual Status
Intuition
Joy
Justice
Leadership
Legacy
Love
Loyalty
Making a difference
Mastery
Merit
Obedience
Openness
Order
Originality
Patriotism
Perfection
Piety
Positivity
Practicality
Preparedness
Professionalism
Prudence
Quality-orientation
Reliability
Resourcefulness
Restraint
Results-oriented
Rigor
Security
Self-actualization
Self-control
Selflessness
Self-reliance
Sensitivity
Serenity
Service
Shrewdness
Simplicity
Soundness
Speed
Spontaneity
Stability
Strategic
Strength
Structure
Success
Support
Teamwork
Temperance
Thankfulness
Thoroughness
Thoughtfulness
Timeliness
Tolerance
Traditionalism
Trustworthiness
Truth-seeking
Understanding
Uniqueness
Unity
Usefulness
Vision
Vitality

Step 5: Prioritize your top values

This step is probably the most difficult, because you’ll have to look deep inside yourself. It’s also the most important step, because, when making a decision, you’ll have to choose between solutions that may satisfy different values. This is when you must know which value is more important to you. 

  • Write down your top values, not in any particular order 
  • Look at the first two values and ask yourself

“If I could satisfy only one of these, which would I choose?” It might help to visualize a situation in which you would have to make that choice. For example, if you compare the values of service and stability, imagine that you must decide whether to sell your house and move to another country to do valuable foreign aid work, or keep your house and volunteer to do charity work closer to home. 

  • Keep working through the list, by comparing each value with each other value, until your list is in the correct order.

Tip:

If you have a tough time doing this, consider using Paired Comparison Analysis to help you. With this method, you decide which of two options is most important, and then assign a score to show how much more important it is.
Since it’s so important to identify and prioritize your values, investing your
time in this step is definitely worth it.

Step 6: Reaffirm your values

Check your top-priority values, and make sure they fit with your life and your vision for yourself. 

  • Do these values make you feel good about yourself? 
  • Are you proud of your top three values? 
  •  Would you be comfortable and proud to tell your values to people you respect and admire? 
  • Do these values represent things you would support, even if your choice isn’t popular, and it puts you in the minority? 

When you consider your values in decision making, you can be sure to keep your sense of integrity and what you know is right, and approach decisions with confidence and clarity. You’ll also know that what you’re doing is best for your current and future happiness and satisfaction.

Making value-based choices may not always be easy. However, making a choice that you know is right is a lot less difficult in the long run.

Key Points

Identifying and understanding your values is a challenging and important exercise. Your personal values are a central part of who you are – and who you want to be. By becoming more aware of these important factors in your life, you can use them as a guide to make the best choice in any situation.

Some of life’s decisions are really about determining what you value most. When many options seem reasonable, it’s helpful and comforting to rely on your values – and use them as a strong guiding force to point you in the right direction.         https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTED_85.htm

 

 

 

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I Am Now In My Bliss – Get into Your Zone

 

 

Love this not just for the words, yet the color just pops and brightens the day!

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Self-Help – The Quickest ‘How To’ Ever ..

This is the most succinct ‘How To’ relating to the Self Help topic that I have come across – and it makes sense!’
 self-help
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Decide to Be Happy

DECIDE TO BE HAPPY! – What great insight – all those years ago!
happy
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11 Things I would have Told My 20-Something Self

 
​Although I still haven’t decided how I feel about this next milestone birthday, the big 5-0 that is looming has caused me to get a little nostalgic. Here are 11 things I would have told my 20-something self:

It’s okay to not have your shit together

There will be a few times in your life when you think you do … but you really won’t. You will have your moments when you feel like an adult … but most of the time you won’t … and that’s okay.

Today, I might give the illusion that I have this whole grownup thing down. Totally faking it.

You don’t want to be with someone that doesn’t want to be with you

I wallowed over more so-called broken hearts in my twenties than I care to admit. Okay, maybe I’d admit it if I could remember … but it was a lot, people. I wish I could tell younger me not to waste time and mascara wallowing over someone who didn’t 110 percent want to be with me. I went through my “I like bad boys” phase and until I stopped chasing after emotionally unavailable assholes or guys that just couldn’t let go of the ex, I was usually moping over somebody who just wasn’t that into me.

Hangovers will hurt like hell when you get older

Go ahead and get those purple hooter shooter things, beer bongs and body shots out of your system now. If you attempt that sort of foolery after a certain age, you’ll wake up feeling like the Macy’s Day Thanksgiving Parade is marching through your head. Or, so I’ve heard.

Your brunette friends with the savage tans are going to have wrinkles and sunspots before they’re 30

Keep using that sunscreen and rock your pasty white legs, girl. Laugh lines are not funny … I don’t care what anyone says … and you’ll have less of them if you remember that SPF is your friend. Your really good friend. See also floppy hats and Jackie O sunglasses.

Learn to say what you think in times of confrontation

Passive-aggressive or whiny might come second nature but that’s not going to do much for you. For example: “I need you to do the dishes once in a while” versus flinging pans and silverware around the kitchen in that “look at meeee, I’m cleaning up your crap” kind of way.

Wait, that’s actually a bad example because I’m still working on that one, but you catch my drift.

Always have a plan B

I’m not saying spend your life what-iffing but stop to think about what you might do if things don’t work out. This has nothing to do with a lack of optimism but having some sort of idea of which direction to go when life throws you a wrench will come in handy.

Choose your friends wisely and don’t neglect them

Life is too precious to hang with jealous bitches or users. If you find yourself yoked to a toxic friend, cut ties. It might be painful but some friendships aren’t meant to — and shouldn’t — last forever. But when you make those good as gold friends, treat them like the treasure they are. You know the ones. They’ll hold your hair while you puke and hold your hand when you cry … and anything else that needs holding along the way. As we roll through life, our needs and priorities change…jobs, relationships and kids can all cause us to put our friendships on the back burner. Most of the time, that really good friend will understand, but make that relationship a priority, too.

Don’t waste your time looking for Mr. Right

Things have a way of sneaking up on you when you least expect them to. Besides, Mr. Right Now can be a hell of a lot of fun, too.

Learn to be good with money

Living within your means, balancing your checkbook and basic investing are not rocket science. It’s not cute to be the girl with the $300 bag that scrounges for gas money in the sofa cushions.

Choose your words wisely

Ask yourself if something is necessary, true or kind before you let it fly out of your mouth. It’s easy to apologize but the phrase “time heals all” isn’t always true. And ditch the phrase “brutally honest” because that’s just an excuse to be a douchebag under the guise of bluntness and it’s usually not productive.

Be spontaneous, but…

Some things are fun to do on a whim, like taking a vacation or changing your hairstyle but there are certain things you shouldn’t do on a whim, like get married, get a tattoo of a semi-automatic weapon on your back, or get a dog. It’s up to you to figure out what you might need to sleep on.

Sometimes, happiness is a choice and sometimes you find what you’re looking for. Look for the good. There’s enough bad stuff that worms its way into our lives, right? Bring it, 49. I’m ready for you. I’ll worry about 50 next year…

Jill Robbins writes about motherhood, midlife and adoption on her blog, Ripped Jeans and Bifocals.

 

 

 

 

“According to the ‘Fair Use’ clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

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Cherokee Prayer Blessing

prayer
What a beautiful prayer – hope you enjoy it too..
 prayer

“According to the ‘Fair Use’ clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”

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10 Tips on Self-Esteem

1. Stop comparing yourself

2. Keep your thoughts positive

3. Accept all compliments with “thank you!”

4. Feed yourself with positivity

5. Associate with supportive people

6. List your past successes

7. Celebrate your qualities

8. Do good for others

9. Find your passion

10. Be you – and don’t apologise.

Thank you to :  http://www.stop-anxiety-panic-attack.com

self-esteem

“According to the ‘Fair Use’ clause of International Copyright Law, the authors declare that the use of the photos, videos and information in this academic research are analyzed for purposes of “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research” according to Section 107 of Title 17 of the US Code.”